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Best Raspberry Pi Projects: December 2022


(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

With the holiday season in full swing, makers have proven that there’s no shortage of fun Raspberry Pi projects to keep you busy and entertained. We’ve got tons of cool projects lined up to get you excited and hopefully inspire some unique creations of your own. From fun seasonal projects to those that can help in emergency situations, the featured makers have pulled out all the stops.

These creators use the best Raspberry Pi accessories and HATs around to add clever features to their projects. These are only some of the projects we’ve had the honor of covering over the past month.

Raspberry Pi Christmas Village

(Image credit: Omantn)

Because we’re well into the holiday season, we’re starting off this list with Omantn’s Raspberry Pi Christmas Village. Omantn brought his wife’s Christmas village models to life with a custom wireless interface using a little help from our favorite single board computer. You can adjust the lights and even control the train as it cruises around the tabletop winter wonderland.

Why we love it:

This is a fun way to use the Raspberry Pi that can help bring families closer together. It’s also a great opportunity to heat up the soldering iron while you’re home on winter break. This project is well-constructed and the end result looks absolutely beautiful.

Read: Raspberry Pi Christmas Village

Raspberry Pi Star Trek UI

(Image credit: Rob, meWho_System47)

If you’re a fan of the Stark Trek universe, you’ve got to check out this amazing LCARS replica—aka a Raspberry Pi-powered Star Trek UI. It looks just like the interface used on the computers in the Star Trek universe. It’s actually a browser-based application but this duo managed to run it on a Raspberry Pi and use real-time sensor data from a suite of Raspberry Pi devices.

Why we love it:

We love Star Trek so of course we’re going to get excited about this project. This UI is beautiful and can even interact with real-world LEDs to bring the red alert system into your home. We had the opportunity to interview the creator of this system and the maker that helped bring it to the Raspberry Pi on our Pi-themed podcast, The Pi Cast.

Read: Raspberry Pi-powered Star Trek UI

Raspberry Pi Big Red Button Pauses Ad Blocking

(Image credit: Kris, Planet Kris)

If you want to block ads on your network at the source, check out our guide on how to set up Pi-Hole on the Raspberry Pi. If you want to put a pause on that ad block system, check out this Pi-powered button that pauses the ad blocking from Pi-Hole.

Why we love it:

This project relies on a Raspberry Pi to block ads, but the button is powered by an ESP8266 microcontroller. The button merely sends a custom command to the Raspberry Pi which turns off ad blocking for a short time. Sure, you could whitelist the websites you don’t want Pi-Hole to block but slapping a button to turn it off is just more fun!

Read: Raspberry Pi Big Red Button Pauses Ad Blocking

Raspberry Pi Super Spooky Sweetie Stealer Stopper

(Image credit: Dr. David Pride)

We’re well past Halloween but we have to take a moment to show off this clever project put together by Dr. David Pride. When trick or treaters reach in for a bit of candy, this ghoulish mask, called the Raspberry Pi Super Spooky Sweetie Stealer Stopper, triggers a horrifying scream accompanied by a blast of fog, courtesy of an upside down can of air duster.

Why we love it:

This project idea is awesome and even cooler to see in action. We had the opportunity to interview Dr. David Pride on our podcast, The Pi Cast, to get a closer look at how it goes together and what it’s like in action.

Read: Raspberry Pi Super Spooky Sweetie Stealer Stopper

Raspberry Pi PCB Streams Game Boy Games

(Image credit: Sebastian Staacks)

Streaming games is nothing new but streaming the video feed from an original Game Boy is definitely out of the ordinary. This maker, Sebastian Staacks, created a custom PCB that plugs into an original Game Boy (or Game Boy Color) and enables users to stream and record game play in real time.

Why we love it:

We love Pi and we love retro gaming—of course we love this project! It’s also very exciting when makers go the extra mile to create their own custom PCBs. This project isn’t just creative in its overall concept but the execution is great and very cool to check out in action.

Read: Raspberry Pi PCB Streams Game Boy Games

Raspberry Pi Radio Transmitter

(Image credit: Hunter Adams)

If you’re looking for a fun project to tune into, check out this Raspberry Pi Radio Transmitter created by Hunter Adams. Using just a Raspberry Pi Pico microcontroller, he’s able to broadcast on radio frequencies. The legality of this project varies depending on where you live to definitely take a moment to confirm local regulations before creating it at home.

Why we love it:

It’s always impressive to see how far users can take a few basic hardware components. This project doesn’t need much to transform the Pico into a workable radio transmitter but the end results are exciting.

Read: Raspberry Pi Radio Transmitter

Raspberry Pi VR Headset for Mice

(Image credit: Schaffer-Nishimura Lab)

A DIY Pi-powered VR headset is cool enough but making one for mice? That’s just as impressive as it is bizarre. This Raspberry Pi VR Headset for Mice was created by the Schaffer-Nishimura Lab for neurological studies. It uses a Raspberry Pi 4 along with a couple of round OLED displays for the visual output.

Why we love it:

Making a Pi-powered VR headset deserves plenty of points in its own right but this use case is so niche and well-executed that we appreciate the ingenuity behind it all-around. The team even designed custom world maps for the mice to explore using Godot that can run on the Pi.

Read: Raspberry Pi VR Headset for Mice

Raspberry Pi Pico Rolling Blackout Logger

(Image credit: Dmytro Panin)

Dmytro Panin is at it again with another Raspberry Pi Pico-powered creation to help make life a little bit easier. This time, he’s created a Raspberry Pi Pico-powered Rolling Blackout Logger. Living in Ukraine, Panin is dealing with rolling blackouts. This project makes it easier to log and track each blackout. The data helps Panin predict future blackouts.

Why we love it:

This is a very useful system to have on hand for anyone living under these circumstances. Panin made the project open source for anyone who needs to make one at home. You can find the source code for it over at Github.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico Rolling Blackout Logger

(Image credit: Dr. David Pride)

Dr. David Pride has made our list twice, this time with a hilarious Raspberry Pi-powered Crying Twitter Logo. Whenever a user leaves Twitter with the hashtag #RIPTwitter, his laser cut Twitter logo cries a single tear using a Pi-powder hydraulic system consisting of a servo and syringe plunger filled with water.

Why we love it:

This project is very well-designed and definitely brings out a laugh or two. It’s really clever overall but, more specifically, we appreciate the design Dr. Pride put together for the crying mechanism. We just haven’t seen anything like this project before and it’s absolutely worth the recognition.

Read: Raspberry Pi Crying Twitter Logo

Raspberry Pi Holographic Anime Virtual Assistant

(Image credit: Jess Peter)

This project, created by Jess Peter, uses a conical acrylic sheet to create a holographic effect for her amazing Raspberry Pi Holographic Anime Virtual Assistant. Not only does she look adorable, she functions as a voice interactive system that can play songs, check the weather and more.

Why we love it:

This is an amazing way to take voice assistants to the next level. It’s a neat concept but the execution is very well done. Maria is a cute little helper whose design is one of the most impressive we’ve ever seen.

Read: Raspberry Pi Holographic Anime Virtual Assistant 

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

We’ve got plenty of cool Raspberry Pi projects to fall back onto as we ease our way into autumn. From mods and hacks to creepy creations from Halloween, these are some of the best projects we’ve had the honor of featuring over the last month. There’s plenty here to get excited about for novice makers and experienced developers alike.

These makers are truly some of the most brilliant around, using the best Raspberry Pi accessories and HATs available to pull off some unique, clever and dazzling projects. If you’re looking for something to recreate at home or just want a little bit of inspiration, this list is definitely for you. 

Raspberry Pi Pico Ambience Keypad

(Image credit: Balthazar Rouberol)

This Pi project was created by dungeon master Balthazar Rouberol with the intention of providing a sense of immersion for his D&D games. Using a Raspberry Pi Pico, he’s created a Pi-powered ambience keypad that will trigger custom music and ambient sound effects at the press of a button. Going into a cave or maybe a dense forested area? He’s got sounds ready to go to bring players into the moment.

Why we love it:

We’re fans of old school RPGs and this is a great example of how you can integrate a Raspberry Pi into the experience. We’ve seen plenty of keypads before but this one is a clever use case with a beautifully executed end design.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico Ambience Keypad

Raspberry Pi Pharmacy Sign Demo

(Image credit: Violet Procyon)

This Pi project is exactly what the doctor ordered. We’ve seen plenty of Pi-powered matrices but this is the first time we’ve come across a pharmacy sign matrix. It’s constructed from five square-shaped matrix panels to create a plus sign shape. The team behind it then devised an impressive demo video complete with audio to show off its creative potential.

Why we love it:

The idea to string together matrix panels into a pharmacy sign is clever enough but the demo video created for the project is very impressive. We like how many people came together to collaborate on the idea and really appreciate the end result.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pharmacy Sign Demo

Raspberry Pi Headless M8 Synthesizer

(Image credit: Ricardo)

This is arguably one of the most groovy projects on our list. If you can’t find the hardware you want, Ricardo shows us that you can always just make it yourself with a Raspberry Pi. Throw in a few Lego blocks for good measure and you’ve got a recipe for success. This headless M8 synthesizer makes it possible to mix jams on the fly with the help of our favorite SBC.

Why we love it:

We love music; we love Pi. It’s almost that simple but what really gets us excited here is the creative potential. There’s no sense in overspending for a piece of hardware when you could make yourself—especially a synthesizer built with Lego. What’s not to love?

Read: Raspberry Pi Headless M8 Synthesizer

Raspberry Pi Open Book with Pico W

(Image credit: Joey Castillo)

Joey Castillo developed his Open Book project a while back but recently added an update to allow support for the Raspberry Pi Pico W. This on-the-go ereader is a great DIY project for anyone who likes to read and tinker. The new addition adds greater flexibility with optional wireless support.

Why we love it:

This is a wonderful project idea on its own but it’s hard not to appreciate projects with ongoing development. The new Pico W support adds an extra bit of functionality that takes this project to the next level.

Read: Raspberry Pi Open Book with Pico W

Raspberry Pi Stray Droid

(Image credit: Illicitpugs)

If you’re a fan of the video game Stray, this is the purr-fect project for you. Illicitpugs has recreated a head from one of the droids found in the game and is using a Pi to power the display used on the face. The Pi-powered droid head cycles from animations found in the game and is mounted on a custom 3D-printed stand.

Why we love it:

This project took quite a bit of work to pull off and the final result is gorgeous. It looks just like one of the droids from the game and integrates the display well into its design. We appreciate the creative endeavor and how much work went into duplicating one of these robotic heads.

Read: Raspberry Pi Stray Droid

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 Overclocked to 2.5 GHz 

(Image credit: Ivan Kuleshov)

This Pi project is more of a Mod, created by maker Ivan Kuleshov. Not only has he overclocked the Compute Module 4 to 2.5 GHz, but he’s also using a custom PCB to help with the process. It has a huge heat sink and requires compressed air to get the job done but the final results speak for themselves.

Why we love it:

Pushing the Pi to its limits is what we’re here for. If you can do it with the Pi — go for it. Should you? That’s another question entirely. We appreciate Kuleshov’s efforts and admire the processing speed he was able to accomplish with his hard work.

Read: Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 Overclocked to 2.5 GHz 

(Image credit: Mairon Wolniewicz)

This isn’t just a CRT media player. Mairon Wolniewicz created a custom user interface to resemble old school VCR menus. It looks gorgeous and has plenty of tools to play with including a media player that sorts media by the decade and even retro gaming options.

Why we love it:

This is a beautiful GUI that blends seamlessly with the retro TV. Users can even open up Spotify with a retro-themed interface that looks just right for a project like this. We don’t just like this project—we need it for ourselves.

Read: Raspberry Pi CRT Retro Media Player

Raspberry Pi Candy Dispenser Costume

(Image credit: Yinglish119)

This Pi project is delicious! Yinglish119 is using a Raspberry Pi to power his Nerds dispensing Nerds costume. It uses an ultrasonic sensor to trigger a magazine loaded mechanism that launches candy into the tray at the bottom. Everything you see was designed and built from scratch by Yinglish119 just for the project.

Why we love it:

This is one nerdy project we can get behind. It’s a fun idea with a great execution that was finished just in time for Halloween. Yinglish119 even went the extra mile to program a jam detection algorithm to prevent any issues while dispensing.

Read: Raspberry Pi Candy Dispenser Costume

Raspberry Pi Pico W Online Geiger Counter

(Image credit: Dmytro Panin)

Dmytro Panin doesn’t live too far from Chernobyl and decided to create this project to keep an eye on radiation levels. Using a Raspberry Pi Pico, he’s created an online Geiger counter that keeps track of radiation levels every few hours and uploads the data to a publically available web-based API.

Why we love it:

Leave it to Dmytro to create a potentially life-saving project. We don’t just appreciate the project as a whole but also its open-source nature and web-based API that allows users to access the data for themselves without the need to recreate the system at home.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico W Online Geiger Counter

Raspberry Pi 1970’s Tank Simulator

(Image credit: Tom Scott)

Ever wanted to know what it’s like to drive a tank? This 1970’s tank simulator recreates the training experience that military personnel encountered when learning how to drive tanks back in the day. It’s one of the last remaining tank simulators in the world and was revived thanks to our favorite SBC, the Raspberry Pi.

Why we love it:

It’s a Raspberry Pi-powered tank simulator—we shouldn’t have to explain ourselves but we’ll try. Reviving old hardware is one of the many possible feats makers pull off with the Raspberry Pi but this is hands down one of the coolest implementations of a Pi we’ve ever seen and would jump at the opportunity to give this simulator a spin.

Read: Raspberry Pi 1970’s Tank Simulator

Tom’s Hardware’s Raspberry Pi Projects

It’s impossible to look at so many amazing creations and not get inspired to make a few projects ourselves. Here are a few projects we’ve been working on complete with guides and instructions on how to recreate them yourself.

How To Remove Backgrounds From Images With Python 

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Did you know you could edit images with Python? You betcha! Les Pounder shows us how it’s done in this guide on how to remove background images with Python. This is one of the most popular languages used for Pi projects so this is definitely worth a look for makers who want to become more familiar with the tool.

Read: How To Remove Backgrounds From Images With Python 

How To Get The News With Raspberry Pi Pico W and CircuitPython

Raspberry Pi Projects: November 2022

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Building your own news feed has never been easier thanks to this CircuitPython-powered Pico W project created by Les Pounder. Les shows us how you can sync up your Pico W with an RSS feed to show real time updates of any news feed you like.

Read: How To Get The News With Raspberry Pi Pico W and CircuitPython 

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

It’s hard to believe it’s already fall but here we are with a fresh batch of Raspberry Pi projects to show off some of the best of what the Pi community has been up to this past month. While it’s still hard to buy a Raspberry Pi 4 or even buy a Raspberry Pi Pico W, there’s plenty you can do with other models of Raspberry Pi.

As usual, these makers pulled out all the stops with the best Raspberry Pi accessories and Raspberry Pi HATs to concoct some seriously exciting creations. If you’re looking to stir up a project this fall season, take a look at these projects and make them yourself or just use them for inspiration to devise a totally unique creation of your own.

Raspberry Pi Live Streaming Camera

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: October 2022

(Image credit: iandroid.eu Lambiase)

Raspberry Pi cameras? We’ve seen plenty. However, this camera project, created by iandroid.eu Lambiase, adds a new twist to the idea. Instead of just working as a regular camera, it’s designed to livestream in real time. Not only does this live streaming camera capture video but it also captures audio thanks to its built-in microphone.

Why we love it:

We appreciate the creative potential of the Raspberry Pi’s camera support but this takes things even further by adding the livestream capability. This 3D printed project is smartly designed to ensure that the Pi is kept cool and safe from water ingress. Lambiase designed the 3D printed shell which adds a few bonus points of creativity and they are offering the STL files for others to use.

Read: Raspberry Pi Live Streaming Camera

Raspberry Pi Pico Powered Hex Color Picker

(Image credit: Guy Dupont)

If you’ve got RGB LEDs, it can be tricky to dial in the color that you want using the values on your PC. This clever gadget lets you adjust the hex code in real time using a series of potentiometers and see exactly what the color will look like on the LED. It was created by Guy Dupont and has been affectionately dubbed The Dial Toner.

Why we love it:

This project really solves a problem that seems unique to makers and those experimenting with RGB LEDs in their projects. It’s such a niche function that we think deserves a little more appreciation for not just the concept but the beautiful execution.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico Powered Hex Color Picker

(Image credit: Saveitforparts)

This is an update to a project we’ve covered in the past. Save It For Parts has created a portable Pi-powered tricorder that can be used to scan the environment around you. But now, you can expand your tricorders capability far beyond your immediate area and detect Starlink satellites by salvaging an LNB module from an old satellite dish.

Why we love it:

We’re nuts for Star Trek but that’s almost par for the course when it comes to tech enthusiasts. This isn’t even the first Raspberry Pi-based tricorder project we’ve covered. What we really appreciate here is the exceptional reach this tricorder has which surely reaches farther than any of the models seen in the Star Trek franchise.

Read: Raspberry Pi Tricorder Detects Starlink Satellites

Raspberry Pi Pico Keyboard has OLED Keycaps

(Image credit: Thpoll, Thomas)

The Raspberry Pi Pico’s RP2040 has quickly become a go-to module for driving custom keyboards but Thomas, also known as Thpoll online, has juiced up the idea by splicing OLED screens underneath each key. This project features two separate keyboard components that work ergonomically as one keyboard. It also has a rotary encoder on the side.

Why we love it:

We love the RP2040, we love keyboards and we most certainly love over engineering projects with features we never dreamed of. This is a clever idea with a wonderful execution that would be one of the coolest additions to your desk, should you take the time to recreate this impressive Pi-powered keyboard system.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico Keyboard has OLED Keycaps

Tom’s Hardware’s Raspberry Pi Projects

Raspberry Pi projects are notably inspiring and it’s hard not to get the itch to make something when looking at so many cool creations. After looking through all of the creations the Pi community devised over the last month, we took the time to create a few guides of our own for anyone interested in digging into some cool projects.

How to Make a Minecraft Server on Raspberry Pi

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: October 2022

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Minecraft is no stranger to the Raspberry Pi, there’s even a special Minecraft edition just for the Pi. In this guide, Our Editor-in-Chief, Avram Piltch shows us how you can set up your own Minecraft server on a Raspberry Pi. With this setup you can finally have your own dedicated machine just for building your own world. It doesn’t take much hardware to recreate but you will need a free afternoon to set it up and test it, of course.

Read: How to Make a Minecraft Server on Raspberry Pi 

How to Turn a Raspberry Pi Into a Wi-Fi Access Point

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: October 2022

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

In this guide, Associate Editor Les Pounder shows us how to turn a Raspberry Pi into a Wi-Fi access point. This is very useful if you’re in a location with only a wired network connection but need to connect a wireless device to the network. The Pi serves as a bridge, essentially working as a wireless router.

Read: How to Turn a Raspberry Pi Into a Wi-Fi Access Point

How To Use Picamera2 to Take Photos With Raspberry Pi

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: October 2022

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Picamera2 is an updated application to the original Picamera that allows users to capture video input on the Raspberry Pi. Users can capture images as well as record video using the application. In this guide, Les shows us how it’s done and what you need to get started.

Read: How To Use Picamera2 to Take Photos With Raspberry Pi


How to Set Up a Headless Raspberry Pi

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: October 2022

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

No monitor? No problem. You can still set up your Raspberry Pi. All you need is a machine separate from the Pi. If you’re not sure how to get started, this guide by Avram will walk you through the process. Before you know it, you’ll be on your way to using your Pi without a second monitor in sight.

Read: How to Set Up a Headless Raspberry Pi

How to Set a Static IP Address on Raspberry Pi

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: October 2022

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

If your Pi project is critical to other devices, projects or networks, you might need to set a static IP address. Thankfully, it’s not too difficult to set up but you will need to delve into the terminal to Set everything up. Not sure where to start? This guide by Avram goes over the entire process from A to Z. All you need is a Raspberry Pi and a network connection.

Read: How to Set a Static IP Address on Raspberry Pi

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

The summer is almost over and we’ve got plenty of Raspberry Pi projects to share that are guaranteed to keep you busy this fall. It might be hard to buy a Pi 4 right now, but in many cases you can substitute an older board if you have one. In addition to full-sized Pis, you can also buy a Pico W for some fun microelectronics projects with the added bonus of network connectivity.

These makers implement some of the best Raspberry Pi accessories you can find and throw in modules, custom PCBs and Raspberry Pi HATs to make some truly creative projects. If you’re looking for some inspiration, this is definitely the list for you. 

Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W Receipt Printer Terminal

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: September 2022

(Image credit: Arseny)

If you’ve ever wondered what you can do with a receipt printer, this Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W receipt printer terminal project from maker Arseny is an excellent source of inspiration. It interacts with the terminal on the Raspberry Pi and prints out the responses in real time on paper.

Why we love it:

This is one sure fire way to guarantee a traceable log of your terminal history. Not only does it keep track of commands and responses, it also has the added benefit of printing out Ascii artwork. As far as interactive Pi projects go, this is one of the most unique we’ve come across.

Read: Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W Receipt Printer Terminal 

Raspberry Pi Apple Mod

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: September 2022

(Image credit: Dave Luna)

If you’re into projects that soup up old hardware, you’re going to love this Raspberry Pi Apple Mod. Using a Raspberry Pi 3 and a Waveshare eInk display, Dave Luna has revitalized this old Macintosh Classic II into a custom Raspberry Pi rig. This custom setup even uses the original Apple peripherals.

Why we love it:

We love Apple and we love the Raspberry Pi so it should come as no surprise that we would get excited over this creation. We’ve seen a few Apple and Raspberry Pi crossovers before but this is the first one we’ve seen that integrates an eInk display.

Read: Raspberry Pi Apple Mod 

Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W Octapod Portable Music Player

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: September 2022

(Image credit: Anil)

Nothing beats music on the go, but what if you could throw in a portable PC into the mix? That’s what maker Anil has created with his Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W Octapod portable music player project. It’s powered by a Pi Zero 2 W and works as both a media player and tiny PC.

Why we love it:

We’ve come across quite a few handmade media players before but this one caught our attention because of its Zero 2 W support and custom epoxy case. Overall, this project is an excellent demonstration of ingenuity and function.

Read: Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W Octapod portable music player 

Raspberry Pi Twitch TV Plays Streams

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: September 2022

(Image credit: rsheldiii)

This project, created by maker and developer rsheldiii, lets you keep up with your favorite twitch.tv streamers without having to open a browser window. His Raspberry Pi Twitch TV plays streams automatically when the stream goes live. It’s housed inside of a 3D printed case that looks like the Twitch logo.

Why we love it:

This is a clever take on the TV trend that’s enveloped the Raspberry Pi community as of late. It doesn’t just play Twitch streams, it automates the process and makes sure you never miss an episode. The fact that it works as a live TV of sorts is what sets it apart from similar projects.

Read: Raspberry Pi Twitch TV plays streams 

Raspberry Pi Pico System Monitor

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: September 2022

(Image credit: Dmytro Panin)

Dmytro is at it again, this time with a Raspberry Pi Pico plug and play system monitor that keeps track of system stats in real time. It uses a Pimoroni display module to show the CPU, GPU, memory, and SSD usage. The information is formatted to display in the form of a bar graph.

Why we love it:

This is a fun take on a simple stat monitor that has a simple, easy-to-use form factor. We appreciate the plug and play nature of its design and how small the overall module is. As always, Dmytro Panin shows us how a little ingenuity can make our everyday lives a little bit easier to navigate.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico System Monitor

Raspberry Pi Terminal Typewriter

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: September 2022

(Image credit: Riley, Artillect)

If you liked the Raspberry Pi terminal receipt printer project we mentioned above, you’re going to love this Raspberry Pi terminal typewriter created by Riley with the YouTube channel Artillect. This setup taps into the Linux terminal running in Raspberry Pi OS and prints everything in real time using a vintage typewriter.

Why we love it:

We love tinkering with old hardware and we love tinkering with the Raspberry Pi. This terminal typewriter project is a beautiful blend of old tech and new tech with a physical paper trail of terminal log entries.

Read: Raspberry Pi Terminal Typewriter

Raspberry Pi USB Backup System

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: September 2022

(Image credit: ThinkLearnDo)

Keeping backups of your data can be a critical process but this Raspberry Pi USB Backup System created by ThInkLearnDo makes the job easier than ever. It also adds a great deal of customization options and is much cheaper than 

Why we love it:

Any excuse to save a few dollars and make your own Pi-powered solution is always a winner in our book. It’s not only a fun learning opportunity but a functional way to make life a little bit easier.

Read: Raspberry Pi USB Backup System

Raspberry Pi Tiny CNC Drawing Machine

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: September 2022

(Image credit: Pheux9558)

This Raspberry Pi project was created by Pheux 9558. Using components from an old floppy drive, he’s made a plotter from scratch that works as a tiny Raspberry Pi-powered CNC drawing machine. This system is capable of drawing tiny pictures on demand with whatever pen or pencil you’ve got on hand.

Why we love it:

This is a great example of how a Raspberry Pi can help transform old hardware into something entirely new. Plotters are fun to play with but this one looks like it’s just as much fun to build.

Read: Raspberry Pi Tiny CNC Drawing Machine 

Raspberry Pi Pico GPIO Ethernet Connection

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: September 2022

(Image credit: Twi_Kingyo)

Maker and developer Twi_Kingyo is using our favorite microcontroller in this Raspberry Pi Pico GPIO Ethernet adapter. At the moment signals only transmit one direction but plans are in the works to upgrade the project to support both sending and receiving data.

Why we love it:

We’re always blown away at the compatibility the Pico can provide and this adapter is no exception. It bridges a connection that we didn’t know we wanted, even after the release of the Raspberry Pi Pico W.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico GPIO Ethernet Connection 

Raspberry Pi Facial Recognition Door Lock

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: September 2022

(Image credit: Dillon McCardell)

Maker and developer Dillon McCardell has created a Raspberry Pi facial recognition door lock. It double checks faces it scans against a database of faces and only unlocks if the person is on the white list. Forget your key? No problem!

Why we love it:

This is an impressive level of work for a Pi project and the end result adds an extra level of security that we can’t help but appreciate. Not only does it integrate AI but it also includes a GUI that can be accessed from any mobile device.

Read: Raspberry Pi Facial Recognition Door Lock 


Tom’s Hardware’s Raspberry Pi Projects

All of the projects we write about are so inspiring we can’t help but make a few of our own. Here are a few things we’ve made over the past month using a Raspberry Pi.

How To Hide Passwords in Your Code With Raspberry Pi Pico W

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: September 2022

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

In this guide, Les shows us how to hide your network password in your Raspberry Pi Pico W code. You should never set aside the importance of network security and this is a great way to keep your network protected while tinkering with the Pico W.

Read: How To Hide Passwords in Your Code With Raspberry Pi Pico W

How to Use Raspberry Pi Pico W With Node-RED

Best Raspberry Pi Projects: September 2022

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Node RED is a great tool for programming on the Pi without digging too deep into code. In this guide, Les shows how to to get started with Node RED on the Raspberry Pi Pico W. This is a great opportunity to explore Node RED if you haven’t checked it out before.

Read: How to Use Raspberry Pi Pico W With Node-RED 

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

The Raspberry Pi is hard to get ahold of right now—we even have a guides dedicated to helping users who want to know where you can buy a Pi 4 or buy a Pico W right now. But that hasn’t stopped makers from doing their best to get their hands on these classic SBCs and building amazing projects to share with the world. Most of these projects are open source so you can recreate them or share them with anyone you like.

These makers use the best Raspberry Pi accessories and Raspberry Pi HATs to create some truly awe-inspiring creations as well as fun novelty projects that make for a fun afternoon activity. If you’re looking for something creative, complex or even just simple to tinker with, this list of projects should get your juices flowing.

Raspberry Pi Pico Smart Door Lock with Alexa

(Image credit: Jithin)

One things for sure, we love the Raspberry Pi Pico and pretty much every other board the RP2040 chip has powered. This project is using the RP2040 to power a custom door locking system. Not only is it remotely operated, it integrates with Amazon Alexa to work as a voice-controlled device.

Why we love it:

This project takes us one step closer to the smart home of our dreams. Not only does it provide a cool, practical function, it takes an impressive amount of ability to construct. Jithin took extra steps to fabricate a custom PCB just for the project. We admire not only the concept but also the execution on this clever project idea.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico Smart Door Lock with Alexa 

Raspberry Pi Pico 6502 Computer Emulator

(Image credit: Eric Badger)

The Pico might not have much processing power compared to a full-sized Pi, but compared to an old 6502 processor, it’s more than capable! This project emuates the classic 6502 on the Pico with great success. In the demonstration video, Badger shows us how well it runs Loderunner next to an Apple II.

Why we love it:

We love retro gaming, we love retro computing and, of course, we love the Raspberry Pi Pico! It’s fun to see this simple microcontroller run old systems as it’s not only entertaining but also a fun example of how far computing power has come over the last few decades.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico 6502 Computer Emulator 

Raspberry Pi Pico PS1 USB Mouse Support

(Image credit: Vojtěch Salajka)

Have you ever wanted to use a USB mouse on a PlayStation 1? Did you even consider that as a valid question before today? This project from Salajka uses a Pico to create an adapter for just such a use case. Now you can operate the PS1 with your favorite input device of choice—a USB mouse.

Why we love it:

Raspberry Pi Picos make great adapters but sometimes we see an adapter that we didn’t even know we wanted. Are USB mice optimal for PS1 controller input? Not always, but it’s a fun idea and we appreciate the opportunity to explore the relationship.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico PS1 USB Mouse Support 

Raspberry Pi Pico GameCube Modchip

(Image credit: Maciej Kobus, Webhdx)

Sometimes it takes a simple project to shake things up in the retrogaming world and this Pico-powered GameCube modchip does just that. With a simple modification, you can launch a custom emulator loading screen right off the bat from your original GameCube console. Similar platforms have existed before but this one is much more affordable, open-source, and easy to install.

Why we love it:

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again—we love retrogaming. This is a fun project for anyone who likes to tinker and wants to modify their GameCube for a few extra gaming options on the side. The project idea is clever and the execution is top notch.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico GameCube Modchip 

Raspberry Pi Open Source MIDI Controller and Sequencer

(Image credit: Niisse)

This project uses a Raspberry Pi 4 to operate a MIDI controller and sequencer system. While the system might be in prototype phase, there’s plenty of action behind it that has us excited. Niisse has programmed a variety of effects that can be modified in real time for some impressive results.

Why we love it:

This project seriously rocks. Just hook up your guitar, or maybe even a keyboard, and you’re well on your way to a custom, DIY concert experience. This might not be the first Pi-powered synth we’ve seen but it’s definitely a well-constructed one worthy of some extra attention.

Read: Raspberry Pi Open Source MIDI Controller and Sequencer 

Raspberry Pi Pico Quacking Duck

(Image credit: Dmytro Panin)

Dmytro Panin has established himself as a maker with no limits on his imagination. This 3D printed duck is Pi-powered and quacks when its motion sensor is triggered. The original purpose of this project was to stop him and his wife from eating too many cookies but it has quickly turned into a surprise quack system.

Why we love it:

This project is a well-constructed example of how ridiculous makers can be. This project is silly, fun, and a great DIY activity for makers looking for something simple yet memorable to create at home.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico Quacking Duck 

Raspberry Pi ML T800 Terminator Skull

(Image credit: Michael Darby, 314Reactor)

If you love Terminator, then you have no excuse not to recreate this awesome T 800 skull project. It’s Pi-powered and doesn’t just look creepy, but also uses AI and machine learning to observe the world around it and assess its surroundings.

Why we love it:

Pi-powered props are always fun but doubly so when they integrate artificial intelligence. We’re not saying that we want this project to start walking around but we’re happy to enjoy it sitting in place—as threatening as it may seem.

Read: Raspberry Pi ML T800 Terminator Skull 

Raspberry Pi Airport Arrivals and Departures Board

(Image credit: Rui Alves)

Frequent flyers rejoice! This project uses a Pi to operate an arrivals and departures board that actually updates in real time with flight data. Never miss a flight or at least keep an eye on local air traffic with this clever project by maker Rui Alves.

Why we love it:

This project isn’t just functional; it looks really cool. It’s designed to resemble flight tracking boards you find in actual airports around the world. We appreciate the concept in and of itself but especially enjoy the design elements that stylize the data in this particular format.

Read: Raspberry Pi Airport Arrivals and Departures Board 

Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W Lego-Powered Submarine

(Image credit: Brick Experiment Channel)

Lego and Pi are already a fun combination, but the moment we realized this was a remote-controlled submarine, we were in heaven! RC cars are one thing but this takes the idea to new depths. It also uses the Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W which we’re happy to see get some love.

Why we love it:

Brick Experiment Channel is no stranger to Lego creations but the way they operate this submarine is impressive. It uses sensors to control pressure and locomate on demand with a remote control. It looks just as fun to play with as it does to build.

Read: Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W Lego-Powered Submarine 

Raspberry Pi James Webb Space Telescope Digital Frame

(Image credit: Cellar Nerd)

We’re beyond stoked to see the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) send back images of deep space but now you can enjoy them from the comfort of your own living room with this gorgeous JWST digital picture frame project by Cellar Nerd. It uses a Pi to rotate through images captured by the telescope and displays them in the middle of a replica of the mirror array.

Why we love it:

This project boldly goes where no maker has gone before—deep space. It looks fantastic and serves as an excellent reminder of what human ingenuity can accomplish on a grand scale. If you want something fun to create with beautiful end results, this project is for you.

Read: Raspberry Pi James Webb Space Telescope Digital Frame

Tom’s Hardware’s Raspberry Pi Projects

It’s hard to look at so many wonderful Raspberry Pi projects day in and day out without getting inspired ourselves. Here are a few creations the staff of Tom’s Hardware have been working on as well as full build guides for anyone interested in recreating them at home. Spoiler alert—we’ve very excited about the Raspberry Pi Pico W.

How To Build a Raspberry Pi Pico W Web App With Anvil

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

In this guide, Les shows us how to create a Pico W-powered web-based application using Anvil. This enables you to run a small web server on the Pico W and access it from any device capable of launching a browser window. You can operate drones, robots, and more with this easy, DIY configuration.

Read: How To Build a Raspberry Pi Pico W Web App With Anvil 

How to Connect Your Raspberry Pi Pico W to Twitter via

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

If This Then That is more than a basic programming principle, it’s a clever tool you can use to make multiple applications work together. In this guide, Les shows us how you can connect your Pico W to Twitter using the application.

Read: How to Connect Your Raspberry Pi Pico W to Twitter via

How to Send and Receive Data Using Raspberry Pi Pico W and MQTT

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

The MQTT protocol is the go-to standard for many DIY projects. If you want to trigger remote notifications from your Pico W, check out this guide from Les. He breaks down everything you need to do to set up communications to keep you and your project on the same page.

Read: How to Send and Receive Data Using Raspberry Pi Pico W and MQTT

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

The Raspberry Pi might be hard to get ahold of right now but it’s not hard to find incredible projects and mind-blowing creations from the maker community. From AI-powered systems to retrogaming gadgets that use original hardware—we’ve got the coolest developments to share with you that we hope can inspire your own projects this summer.

These makers pull out the best Raspberry Pi accessories, and Raspberry Pi HATs to bring their clever designs to fruition. We’ve already featured each of these once individually in the past month and we think it’s time to do it again. These projects are the best of the best and deserve a second wave of love from the maker community at large.

Raspberry Pi AI-Powered Plate Balances Ball

(Image credit: Parisiancyclist)

If you’ve had trouble keeping your ducks in a row, this ball balancing project by Parisiancyclist might help you keep things in order. Using a Raspberry Pi and the power of artificial intelligence, it tracks a ball and adjusts the plate underneath it to stop the ball from rolling over the edge. In the demo video, we can see it in action as he pokes the ball before the Pi quickly adjsuts the plate to stop it from falling just in time.

Why we love it:

It never ceases to amaze us what users are capable of implementing with AI on the Raspberry Pi. We’ve seen several tracking projects but never something this well-designed and fast-acting. No doubt there are plenty of use cases for this sort of technology and we’re excited to see a concept like this in action.

Read: AI-Powered Ball Balancing Plate

Raspberry Pi Zero 2 Wii Nunchuck Wireless Mouse

(Image credit: Adrian Papineau)

Can’t afford Google Glass? No problem, Adrian Papineau has you covered with his DIY augmented reality headset but how do you navigate the menu? With an old Wii Nunchuck of course! This Pi-powered Nunchuck can be used as a mouse for his custom glasses while on the go.

Why we love it:

We’re always excited to see old hardware put to good use but this project doesn’t restore the old hardware, it adapts it to be a useful asset for modern technology. According to Papineau, it gets plenty of use on his daily walks so it’s more than a proof-of-concept, it’s a practical tool used in his daily life.

Read: Wii Nunchuck Mouse

Raspberry Pi TV Simulator

(Image credit: Rodrigo Feliciano)

There’s no remote needed for this project. Rodrigo Feliciano’s Raspberry Pi TV simulator can be navigated using the knob on the side. Inside is a Raspberry Pi programmed with custom channels that play videos off the Pi and displays them on the old screen. It even uses the TV to generate static between channels while “tuning” them in.

Why we love it:

This project concept is really fun but the implementation is an absolute winner in our book. It looks fantastic, it captures the look and feel of watching media on an old TV but it also has the Raspberry Pi guts to make a maker happy.

Read: Raspberry Pi TV Simulator

Raspberry Pi Pico PlayStation Memory Card

(Image credit: Daniele Giuliani)

Thanks to Daniele Giuliani’s memory card project, you can officially save your PlayStation games using the power of the Raspberry Pi Pico! This project merges retro hardware with our favorite SBC for the perfect blend of nostalgia and maker’s delight. Sure you could buy an old memory card but where’s the fun in that?

Why we love it:

It’s no secret that we love retro gaming and this project is a great excuse to play some old games again…for testing purposes, of course. If you’re looking for a fun way to tinker while enjoying the content of consoles past, this is a great project.

Read: Pico-Powered PlayStation Memory Card

Raspberry Pi 3A+ More RAM Mod

(Image credit: Pi800)

Like we said before, Pis are somewhat hard to get ahold of right now. But if you can’t find the module you want, you might be able to frankenstein together the Pi you need using old parts. Pi800 has done just that by upgrading a 3A+ to use a 1 GB RAM chip.

Why we love it:

We love any opportunity for makers to dig deeper into microelectronics and this is an inspirational example of how tinkering with the original hardware is not only possible but practical. According to Pi800, his modded Pi 3A+ even had better performance than the 3B+ when testing!

Read: Raspberry Pi 3A+ More RAM Mod

Raspberry Pi E-Paper Zoetrope

(Image credit: Brian Corteil)

Playing video on a Raspberry Pi is nothing new but animating on a Pi with e-paper displays in the form of a zoetrope is definitely thinking outside of the box! Brian Corteil created this masterpiece to showcase at EMF Camp—an outdoor convention for makers to gather and share all things microelectronics.

Why we love it:

This project did much more than display a simple animation. It also brought people together by providing a Pi-powered scanning system that would read sheets and process them into new animations. Makers could draw their own cartoons and watch them on the zoetrope.

Read: Raspberry Pi Zoetrope

Raspberry Pi Pico Nintendo 64 Flash Cart

(Image credit: Konrad Beckmann)

This RP2040 project, which maker Konrad Beckmann dubs the PiCart64, allows you to create a custom flash cart for the Nintendo 64. Not only does it support existing ROMs but users can also run homebrew ROMs on the actual Nintendo 64 console. Just load up the ROM and pop it in the slot!

Why we love it:

This is a fun excuse to pull out your old Nintendo 64 (as if you didn’t already have it out and connected to your TV anyway). It’s a great example of how the RP2040 can be applied to old hardware and bridge the gap between old software and new with a simple, custom made PCB.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico Drives $10 Nintendo 64 Flash Cart

Raspberry Pi Zero Prints Giant Pictures with Thermal Receipt Printer

(Image credit: -PJFry-)

Don’t have a full sized printer? No problem! -PJFry- is using a Pi to print out large-scale images using a thermal receipt printer. It creates images one strip at a time that can be lined up to make a full-scale copy. Is it practical? Not excactly but it’s a great proof of concept that adds a little artistic flare.

Why we love it:

The idea of printing smaller images to piece together a larger image is nothing new but we haven’t seen anyone do this with a Raspberry Pi before. It took a fair bit of work to program this to work on the Pi and we always appreciate the time makers take to include the Pi in fun ideas like this.

Read: Raspberry Pi Prints Big Pictures on Thermal Printer

Raspberry Pi Robot Maps Rooms with LiDAR Sensor

(Image credit: S Lab)

S Lab has created a fun way to visualize the LiDAR sensor data from a robotic car by sending the information to Unity. This setup creates a 3D representation of the room it detects and also projects an estimation of the robot cars location in relation to the walls of the room.

Why we love it:

We’ve seen plentey of projects put distance sensors on their robots to avoid obstacles but this is the first time we’ve seen a LiDAR sensor create a digital map of the room it’s in. There are so many practical applications for this technology and it’s incredible to see the concept in action.

Read: Raspberry Pi LiDAR Sensor 3D Map

Raspberry Pi Pico W Projects

(Image credit: Pimoroni, Richard Hayler, Arm, pi3g)

The Pico W is here and we’re beyond excited to share a slew of new wireless Pico W-powered projects from the community! We’ve got tons of cool things to share like a wireless plant monitor, network detector, and even a web server created by several makers including Pimoroni, Richard Hayler, ARM, and Pi3g.

Why we love it:

This is just the start of a new era in Pi projects and we couldn’t help but showcase several great creations together. We want to see what the community is capable of and these projects are sure to inspire a maker or two to heat up their solder irons this summer.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico W Projects

Tom’s Hardware’s Raspberry Pi Projects

It’s really hard not to make projects of our own after looking at hundreds of creations from the Pi community. So here’s a look at what the Tom’s Hardware staff has been up to complete with guides you can follow along with to recreate these projects at home.

How to Connect Raspberry Pi Pico W to the Internet

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

In this guide, Les Pounder shows us how to get started with using Wi-Fi on the Raspberry Pi Pico W microcontroller. Surprisingly, it doesn’t take much more than a few lines of code to get going. All you need is a Pico W and a wireless network to connect to and you’re well on your way.

Read: How to Connect a Pico W to the Internet 

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

It’s hard to believe that summer is already here but it’s not hard to believe that makers have been super busy churning out some super cool Raspberry Pi projects. As the weather warms up for those in the northern hemisphere, so do the soldering irons of makers around the world.

The makers featured in our list this month pulled out all the stops, using the best of the best Raspberry Pi accessories, HATs and more with some of the most creative concepts we’ve seen yet. Even if you don’t have cool accessories, these will show you how a little bit of ingenuity and programming can take your project to the next level. 

Raspberry Pi Changes Webcam Background

(Image credit: Freedom Tech)

With a little bit of programming and nothing more than a Pi with a webcam, Freedom Tech is able to automatically change the background of live video feeds. Users can add custom colors, pictures and more for a real-time effect that you can use for video conferencing.

Why we love it:

It’s more common today than ever to work from home. This project makes it easy to apply a professional touch to your video feed that hides your real background with anything of your choosing and you don’t even need a green screen! We appreciate the versatility of the project and work put in to make it a reality. Plus it’s open source so  what’s not to love?

Read: Raspberry Pi Changes Webcam Background

Raspberry Pi Pico Retro Controller To USB Converter

(Image credit: Lee, More Fun Making It)

In a world of competing standards, sometimes you just need to find the right adapter and that’s exactly what Lee from More Fun Making It has done with this clever Pico controller to USB converter project. Using our favorite RP2040 microcontroller, he can connect a retro game controller as a USB device.

Why we love it:

Emulating old software is awesome, using original hardware along with it is even more awesome! This converter is super useful and super cheap compared to similar aftermarket equivalents. Besides, making your own hardware is definitely more fun.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico Retro Controller To USB Converter

Raspberry Pi Zero Flying Geese Quilt Block Clock

(Image credit: Russell Eveleigh)

This project combines two hobbies into one with some seriously impressive results. Not only did Russell Eveleigh quilt a beautiful flying geese quilt block into a circle but it doubles as a clock and egg timer—complete with some stellar LED effects.

Why we love it:

Useful projects that you can set up for daily use are really cool and this one is incredibly unique, showing off years of hard work that culminate into a clever, visually appealing design. This project doesn’t just talk the talk, it walks the walk.

Read: Raspberry Pi Zero Flying Geese Quilt Block Clock

Raspberry Pi HAL 9000 Voice Assistant

(Image credit: Jürgen Pabel)

This eerie project is as functional as it is cool! What looks like a prop from the sci fi classic 2001: A Space Odyssey actually works as an interactive voice assistant. This Raspberry Pi-powered HAL 9000 replica is even fitted with a round LCD display hidden behind a fisheye cover.

Why we love it:

Just when you think you’ve seen it all, someone comes along to remind us how a little work and a 3D printer can bring the fictional world to life. Thankfully this project doesn’t have nearly as much control as the original HAL 9000 had…or does it?

Read: Raspberry Pi HAL 9000 Voice Assistant

Raspberry Pi Stranger Things Phone Prop

(Image credit: Guy Dupont)

This phone prop was made for the Season 4 Primiere of Stranger Things. It randomly rings, playing fun sound bites for users who answer the phone and has a functional dial pad that returns a busy signal when dialing out.

Why we love it:

We’re no stranger to Stranger Things—we even have a guide on how to make the famous Christmas Lights that light up to spell custom messages on command. But this is one of the most unique creations we’ve come across pertaining to the series and it was supposedly commissioned by the official team for the Season 4 Premier!

Read: Raspberry Pi Stranger Things Phone Prop

Raspberry Pi Measures Distance with a Webcam and Open CV

(Image credit: Freedom Tech)

No distance sensor? No problem! Freedom Tech shows us how you can calculate distance using Open CV and a little bit of programming. In his example, he’s using the application to track his hand and estimate its distance from the camera.

Why we love it:

This project shows how there’s no excuse for laziness. Where there’s a Pi, there’s a way. All you need is a little bit of work and a creative spark to find a solution when you don’t have the hardware you think you need.

Read: Raspberry Pi Measures Distance with a Webcam and Open CV

Raspberry Pi Zero Game Boy Drop-In Kit

(Image credit: Zarcadeuk)

We love retro gaming and we love the Raspberry Pi. Want to make us drool? Throw a Raspberry Pi into a retro handheld. This open source Pi Zero drop in kit fits snugly inside the original Game Boy, providing an LCD along with the support of digital emulation to play games the way they were meant to—hacked with a Pi.

Why we love it:

We’re suckers for the original Game Boy and love open source platforms that bring the community together. Not only did Zarcadeuk make this project, he’s provided it to everyone who’s interested in creating it themselves.

Read: Raspberry Pi Zero Game Boy Drop-In Kit

Raspberry Pi Matrix Dashboard

(Image credit: Allen’s Lab)

Matrix displays are super fun to play with but can be a little challenging to get off the ground with. This matrix dashboard created by Allen’s Lab makes the process easy, providing plenty of fun features like Spotify integration, calendar tracking and even simple stuff like a clock.

Why we love it:

This project makes it much easier for makers to get started with using a matrix by eliminating the steps that come with creating an interface from scratch. It’s a beautiful interface and the end result is a highly functional asset for any home.

Read: Raspberry Pi Matrix Dashboard

All-in-One Raspberry Pi Emulator Projector

(Image credit: Mw33212)

Gaming on the go? You betcha! This Raspberry Pi gaming projector turns any wall into a screen and is packed with fun games that run on an emulator. Users can take it anywhere and play anything they want as long as it can run on the Raspberry Pi.

Why we love it:

From movies to gaming, this truly is an all-in-one project. It not only works as intended but also has one of the sleekest housing designs we’ve come across in some time. The case was made from scratch using wood and is very well-finished.

Read: All-in-One Raspberry Pi Emulator Projector

Raspberry Pi Retro Gaming CRT TV

(Image credit: JamHamster)

How can we not feature a JamHamster creation? His work always comes together as one of the most artistic and functional assets you could ask a maker to make. This particular project houses a Raspberry Pi inside of an old Portavision 7-inch TV.

Why we love it:

This project is over engineered in the best ways possible. It has a Pi inside, mounted to a laser cut metal frame and features an IPS screen behind a custom carved chunk of acrylic. It looks amazing and just as fun to play with as it does to look at.

Read: Raspberry Pi Retro Gaming CRT TV 

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

With summer right around the corner, it’s time to spring into some of the most awe inspiring Raspberry Pi we’ve come across this year. We’re taking a look at ten Raspberry Pi projects that knocked our socks off and then used ML with automation to somehow put them on again.

These makers are using the best Raspberry Pi accessories and HATs to bring their ideas to fruition in an incredible display of ingenuity and technical understanding. We’ve got light-hearted projects with pop culture references and even more serious, complex systems designed to monitor air raid sirens. If you’re looking for inspiration or just want to see what the clever Pi community has been up to as of late, this is definitely a list you want to dig into. 

Raspberry Pi Knight Rider’s KITT Replica

(Image credit: Fred Arias)

If you’re a fan of Knight Rider, you’re not alone—maker Fred Arias shows his appreciation for the classic series with this awesome Pico-powered KITT replica. It listens for audio input and responds with a small database of soundbites, complete with matching LED effects.

Why we love it:

This isn’t the first time we’ve seen a Pi used for projects like this—readers might remember this impressive Pi-powered GLaDOS replica from the Portal franchise. What we really appreciate about this KITT replica project is the decision to power it with a Raspberry Pi Pico.

Read: Knight Rider KITT Pico Project 

Raspberry Pi + Raspberry Pi Pico Robot Lawnmower Project 

(Image credit: Clemens Elflein)

Automated lawnmowers might be available on the market but they certainly don’t come with the fun of making you own with a Raspberry Pi. Clemens Elfein is behind this project which uses both a Raspberry Pi and a Pico to operate this open source lawn mowing system.

Why we love it:

The best Raspberry Pi projects are the ones with practical uses and there’s nothing quite like upgrading your at-home lawncare service. This project looks fun to put together and just as fun to operate.

Read: Open Source Lawn Mower 

3D-Printed Raspberry Pi Radio Streams Lofi Beats

(Image credit: Nicholas Sherlock)

If you’re looking for a fun Pi project to help you relax, you’ve got to check out this LoFi Hip Hop streaming Raspberry Pi-powered speaker project known as the Lofipi by maker Nicholas Sherlock. This DIY radio is housed inside of a custom 3D-printed shell featuring a faux wood texture finish.

Why we love it:

A project doesn’t need to be complex to be impressive and well-executed. This project is a great example of how a creative eye can push a project design to its limits. It’s flexible enough to be adapted to a variety of audio-based needs and looks fantastic.

Read: Lofi Hip Hop Radio 

Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W Turns 70-Year-Old Camera Digital 

(Image credit: Airpocket)

Maker Airpocket purchased a 70-year-old camera and brought it into the digital age with the help of a Zero 2 W. The small form factor helps it fit neatly inside the old shell and allows users to record with the original lens hardware.

Why we love it:

While we can almost always appreciate a Pi project that restores vintage hardware, this one catches our attention both from a technical and artistic perspective. It records video digitally but everything is captured through the vintage lens.

Read: Raspberry Pi Vintage Camera

Raspberry Pi Pico Tracks the Sun

(Image credit: Dr2mod)

Want to put that spare e-ink display to use? Take a closer look at Dr2mod’s Pico-powered sun tracking project. It doesn’t exactly track the sun so much as it makes an estimation baseds off of factors like the user’s location. The final project outputs with a custom interface that looks as sleek as it is functional.

Why we love it:

The Pico is an inexpensive board but its use cases are seemingly endless and this project is a great example. Whether you’re a science teacher or just a general microelectronic enthusiast, this sun tracker provides plenty to intrigue and appreciate.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico Sun Tracker 

Raspberry Pi Zero Powers 3D-Printed Interchangeable Lens Camera 

(Image credit: Christopher Getschmann)

There’s something missing from modern digital cameras and maker Christopher Getschmann aims to put it back with his custom, Pi-powered camera project. These cameras are powered by a Raspberry Pi Zero and feature interchangeable lenses.

Why we love it:

This project integrates so many fun things from microelectronics and 3D printing to photography and art. The final cameras feature impressively finished designs and come bundled with enough features to entertain both novices and professionals alike.

Read: Raspberry Pi Cameras 

Fake Raspberry Pi Terminal 

(Image credit: Dan Aldred)

This terminal looks fantastic but that’s about all it does. Breathing life into an old Argus brand PreViewer, this fake terminal project (known as the Ferminal) by Dan Aldred allows users to type on the screen but it doesn’t actually accept commands or run functions.

Why we love it:

We don’t even need a working terminal to be impressed, Dan Aldred’s Ferminal looks the part without walking the walk and that’s fine by us. The interface was written in Python and produces pixelated text on an LCD screen, dropping to the next line when users type to the end of the row.

Read: Ferminal Raspberry Pi Terminal

Raspberry Pi Unlocks Computer by Detecting Push-Ups

(Image credit: Victor Sonck)

Are you locked out of your PC? If you’re maker Victor Sonck, it’s time to feel the burn. Using  a Raspberry Pi along with a bit of machine learning, he unlocks his PC by knocking out a few reps of push ups in front of a camera.

Why we love it:

Motion tracking projects are cool enough on their own but this one puts the technology to functional use! Long gone are the days of sitting at your PC for hours. If you get locked out, you’ve got to get up with this project.

Read: Raspberry Pi Push Ups Unlock PC 

Raspberry Pi Monitors Air Raid Sirens in Ukraine 

(Image credit: Dr2mod)

This project uses an e-Ink display to relay information about current air raid sirens across Ukraine. The data is pulled from the internet and updated in real time for us. States are highlighted to indicate high or low risk concern.

Why we love it:

This is an open souce project for anyone who wants to track the current situation in Ukraine. The creation is impressive enough on its own but extending the work in an open source manner is critical given its intended purpose.

Read: Ukraine Air Raid Siren Monitor

Raspberry Pi Robot With Pimoroni Servo 2040

(Image credit: Kevin McAleer)

With Raspberry Pi projects, one idea often springboards into another—in this case the project springs about itself! With the help of a Pimoroni Servo 2040, this 3D printed rabbit robot is capable of locomotion and is totally open source.

Why we love it:

If we found something like this we would definitely be intrigued but this is even better—you can make your own at home along with a selection of other robotic creatures including a cat that this rabbit is based on. The designs are clean and make for a fun gadget at the end of the day.

Read: Raspberry Pi Robot Bunny 

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Spring is here, the flowers are blooming and the makers are tinkering. It’s been an exciting month in the Raspberry Pi community and choosing projects to feature is never easy. That said, we’re giving ten Pi projects another chance to shine this month and have plenty to inspire everyone from novice creators to the most experienced developer.

These projects are some of the best around and we’ll be sure to share all of the juicy details about how they work and what you’ll need to make them at home, if you can. You don’t always need the best Raspberry Pi accessories and HATs to make an incredible project but they sure can help add a variety of features to your creation. 

Raspberry Pi Pinball Table

(Image credit: Chris Dalke)

DIY arcade cabinets are always a hit with gamers and makers alike but it’s not too often that we come across a pinball machine. This isn’t a traditional pinball machine but it’s just as exciting nonetheless featuring a digital panel and animated gameplay. 

Why we love it:

It’s no secret that we love arcade emulation here at Tom’s Hardware. We’ve seen plenty of arcade cabinets but not so many dedicated to pinball. The custom case is just icing on the cake, lending to an impressive finished design.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pinball Machine 

Raspberry Pi Retro TV Gaming Console

(Image credit: JamHamster)

When maker JamHamster whips up something new, it’s hard not to fall in love. From the sleek metallic finishes to the bright orange highlights, JamHamster projects are known for their unique flavor and often Pi-fillled design. This retro TV has been modified to function as an all-in-one-gaming console.

Why we love it:

This custom console uses the RGBerry HAT which adds composite video support for an authentic retro gaming experience. The only shame is that such a well-designed interior is completely hidden away inside the housing.

Read: Raspberry Pi Console TV 

Raspberry Pi Zork Thermal Printer

Raspberry Pi Projects: April 2022

(Image credit: Irrer Polterer)

Emulating games on the Raspberry Pi is almost always a winning go-to project but this thermal printer Zork project takes the idea to the next level. Not only does it print out lines from the text-based adventure game Zork but it also allows users to play it together online using YouTube’s chat feature.

Why we love it:

There’s always at least one project every month that makes the average person ask “Why?” and the maker ask “Why not?” and this is that project. You don’t even need to know what Zork is to appreciate the ingenuity behind this project design.

Read: Raspberry Pi Zork Printer 

Raspberry Pi 4 Retro Apple Experience

(Image credit: MajorWahoobies)

If you’re a fan of old school Apple hardware, this project might make you do a double take. This old Macintosh SE/30 houses a Raspberry Pi running an OS skin that resembles the design of old school MacOS.

Why we love it:

Any project that recycles vintage hardware is bound to get us excited. This project looks the part both hardware-wise and software-wise. Because the OS only looks like MacOS, you still get a full Linux experience, highlighting the best of both worlds.

Read: Raspberry Pi Macintosh SE/30 

Raspberry Pi Smart Pokédex

(Image credit: Sam Makes)

Some makers just want to be the very best and Same Makes is clearly one of them. This Raspberry Pi smart Pokédex looks and functions just like the one from the fictional Pokémon universe.

Why we love it:

We’ve seen Pokédex-shaped handheld consoles but never one that aims to reproduce the original purpose of the device. Users can point the smart Pokédex at objects and it will use AI to assess then identify the object out loud.

Read: Raspberry Pi Smart Pokédex 

Raspberry Pi Automatic Sustainable Farming Robot

(Image credit: Twisted Fields)

The best part about perusing through Raspberry Pi projects is appreciating their versatility. This Pi is being used to power a sustainable farming robot. This four-wheeled creation helps manage various farming needs and can locomote across rough terrain.

Why we love it:

We knew it probably wouldn’t hurt to add a Raspberry Pi to our emergency prep list but now we’re certain they would also be a critical asset to building a futuristic farm of our dreams. This project is also a great example of the Pi’s potential in industrial uses.

Read: Raspberry Pi Farm Robot 

Raspberry Pi Lego Star Finding Lego Robot

(Image credit: EldenGoat)

You can build almost anything with Lego bricks—throw in a Raspberry Pi and you can make your Lego creations do almost anything. Reddit maker EldenGoat has created a Lego-based Pi project that can be used to locate stars in the sky.

Why we love it:

This is, simply put, a stellar project. We love Lego and we love Pi but this project is just out of this world. It’s hard not to feel inspired by something built using our favorite childhood building medium.

Read: Raspberry Pi Star Finder 

Raspberry Pi Pico Doom Port

(Image credit: Graham Sanderson)

“Can it run Doom?” has truly become the goto benchmark question for microelectronics. If you’re wondering about the Pico—yes. It can totally run Doom thanks to this port created by Graham Sanderson.

Why we love it:

It’s always fun to see what new hardware is capable of running Doom and we definitely appreciate that this port was developed just for our favorite microcontroller. If you’ve been curious about an RP2040-powered Doom experience, now is your chance to check it out up close.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico Doom 

Raspberry Pi Pico Fiber-Optic Display

(Image credit: ElliotMade)

Most developers consider their projects art but this project created by maker ElliotMade leaves no room for doubt. This Pi-powered fiber optic display illuminated fiber optic cables using an RGB matrix for a dazzling rainbow light show.

Why we love it:

Blinking an LED is often the first project makers tackle with the Raspberry Pi but there’s no reason it can develop into a more complicated design and this project is a shining example.

Read: Raspberry Pi Fiber Optic Display 

Raspberry Pi UV Custom PCB Machine

(Image credit: Wolfy-j)

This project was made for makers who make projects. Dubbed The Medusa, this project is designed to create PCB prototypes using UV light, saving makers tons of time when it comes to developing custom circuit boards.

Why we love it:

It’s a Pi-powered machine made for making more pi-powered projects. It’s hard not to appreciate such a valuable tool that relies mainly on our favorite SBC. It’s useful, well-designed, and guaranteed to make a few developers feel a hint of jealousy.

Read: Raspberry Pi UV PCB Machine

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

You’re in luck! This month we’ve got plenty of Raspberry Pi projects to fill your inspiration pot with enough gold guaranteed to entertain all summer long. These makers pulled out all the stops to create some of the most fun, imaginative and scientifically-intriguing projects we’ve seen yet.

These developers make use of the best Raspberry Pi accessories and HATs to create some truly unique and inspiring creations. Whether you’re looking for a project to make at home or just want to see what the brilliant makers in the Pi community are up to, this list has got you covered.

Raspberry Pi 3D Scanner OpenScan

(Image credit: Thomas Megel, OpenScan)

Photogrammetry is the process of using a camera to scan a real life object to create a 3D rendering of that object. OpenScan makes it possible to power your own photogrammetry rig with a Raspberry Pi. The latest update makes room for some seriously high quality results as it supports the latest HD Arducam module.

Why we love it:

This project goes to show that it’s possible to create professional grade technology with a little ingenuity and a Raspberry Pi. The latest progress on OpenScan helps amp up the quality for DIY photogrammetry rigs.

Read: Raspberry Pi 3D Scanner OpenScan

Raspberry Pi Security Camera Window

(Image credit: Snicker1633)

Looking for a new perspective? This Raspberry Pi-powered window provides maker Snicker1633 with a view of their home security camera while they’re working at the office. Instead of using your typical pane of glass, it features a huge monitor with some molding attached to resemble a window.

Why we love it:

When we first found this project, we couldn’t help but exclaim “Great Scott!” This simple project shows how far a clever mind can take us into the future. If you’ve ever wanted to tune into the scenery channel, now is your chance.

Read: Raspberry Pi Security Camera Window

Raspberry Pi Trinocular Microscope Image Capturing

(Image credit: Gary Croft)

Trinocular microscopes open up the microscopic world to the digital realm. With the help of a Raspberry Pi, Gary Croft has managed to record both still images and video for an incredible up close look at the micro world around us.

Why we love it:

This is one of the coolest projects you can find as a science lover. If you want to start a microbiology laboratory at home, this Pi-powered image capturing system is a great place to start.

Read: Raspberry Pi Trinocular Microscope Image Capturing

Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W Open-Source Handheld

(Image credit: Penk Chen)

We knew it wouldn’t be long before the Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W appeared as the main board for a custom handheld. This system was developed by Penk Chen and features a keyboard and screen in the form of a foldable handheld device.

Why we love it:

Of course we were excited to see the Zero 2 W get some love but what we really appreciate here is the finished design. This handheld looks sleek and fits a form factor you just don’t see often in many handheld projects.

Read: Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W Open-Source Handheld

Raspberry Pi Automatic Vignette Generator

(Image credit: Penk Chen)

This Raspberry Pi-powered Vignette Generator was created by Andy Adkin. If you’re not familiar with vignettes, it’s basically a short video clip comprised of photos taken over a set amount of time. In this project, Adkin is compressing 15 minutes of footage into 15 second clips to be shared with Twitter.

Why we love it:

This project stood out to us as a fun, Pi-fueled way to connect with others during lockdowns. It might be hard to get out and travel right now, but Adkin’s project provides a quick glimpse for curious parties of a seaside view in Wales.

Read: Raspberry Pi Automatic Vignette Generator

Raspberry Pi Pico Never-ending Breakbeats

(Image credit: Tod Kurt)

Tod Kurt, aka Todbot is using our favorite microcontroller, the Raspberry Pi Pico to power this never-ending breakbeat system. If you’re looking to jam, he was nice enough to share all of the details for anyone curious about recreating it at home.

Why we love it:

We’re always looking for excuses to get down and it’s hard to say no when a Raspberry Pi is thrown into the mix. This project is super niche but also super groovy. If you’re looking for a music-based project to tinker around with, check out this one for sure.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico Never-ending Breakbeats

Raspberry Pi Rubik’s Cube Solver

(Image credit: Andrea Favero)

Solving a Rubik’s cube is arguably the whole point of having one. That said, programming a Raspberry Pi to do things for you it’s main purpose. In this project, the Raspberry Pi has won as Andrea Favero is using one to automatically solve Rubik’s cubes.

Why we love it:

Just because you can do something doesn’t mean you should but with Raspberry Pi projects, that’s half the fun. The process of evaluating the cube, planning the resolution, and seeing it through is really impressive on its own—but doubly so when a Raspberry Pi does it for us.

Read: Raspberry Pi Rubik’s Cube Solver

(Image credit: Circuit Digest)

This Raspberry Pi Smart Shopping Cart proves that there’s no point in buying new what you can make yourself. With a few components and a Raspberry Pi, you can devise a system capable of managing inventory and tallying sales.

Why we love it:

It’s almost always worth it in life to make something yourself. Whether it’s for cost benefit or the learning experience along the way, this project is a great example of how easy it is to construct a business solution from scratch.

Read: Raspberry Pi Smart Shopping Cart

Raspberry Pi Oscilloscope

(Image credit: How To Electronics)

There’s nothing worse than needing a tool that you just can’t seem to find—but where there’s a Pi, there’s a way! This project uses a Raspberry Pi to power a custom oscilloscope complete with a smartphone display.

Why we love it:

This is a super useful tool that blows our mind that it can be made with just a Raspberry Pi Pico. According to How To Electronics, the configuration is capable of detecting frequencies of up to 250KHz.

Read: Raspberry Pi Oscilloscope

USB4VC Raspberry Pi Retro Peripheral Adapter

(Image credit: DekuNukem)

Playing on old computers is always a treat in itself but if you’ve ever wanted to use modern USB peripherals with them, you’re going to have a hard time. Thankfully, DekuNukem created this awesome USB4VC adapter that converts the USB input into a recognizable format for vintage PCs using a Raspberry Pi.

Why we love it:

We love vintage computers, we love Raspberry Pi—this project was a recipe for success from the start. It’s always exciting to see projects that help prolong the life of older hardware and this one adds a fun way to interface with older computers that might not otherwise get much attention.

Read: USB4VC Raspberry Pi Retro Peripheral Adapter

Tom’s Hardware’s Raspberry Pi Projects

After looking at community projects all month long, we couldn’t help but whip up a few of our own. These projects are created by the staff here at Tom’s Hardware and include full parts lists, instructions, and pictures to help anyone interested in recreating them at home.

How To Run Long-running Scripts on a Raspberry Pi

(Image credit: Shutterstock)

Running long-running scripts on the Raspberry Pi is critical to many projects that require ongoing monitoring. But did you know you can start long-running processes over SSH? Ryder shows us how to initiate these processes from the machine of your choosing.

Read: How To Run Long-running Scripts on a Raspberry Pi

How to Install Raspberry Pi OS Over the Internet

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

No PC? No problem. In this guide, Les demonstrates how to install Raspberry Pi OS over the internet. You will need a PC for firmware updates but it’s still possible to put the OS on a Pi without one initially. 

Read: How to Install Raspberry Pi OS Over the Internet

How to Build a Morse Code Receiver with Raspberry Pi

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

In the age of digital communication, the one form many of us are lacking is a morse code receiver. If you want to recreate this old technology, Ryder’s got you covered and shows how to build on with a Raspberry Pi.

Read: How to Build a Morse Code Receiver with Raspberry Pi

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

As we welcome the lovely month of February, we can’t help but admire all the hard work makers have already put into new Raspberry Pi projects in 2022. We love the Raspberry Pi but not as much as we love the Pi community and the plethora of creations that grace our screens every day. These developers pulled out the best tools in their arsenal and we think their work deserves a little extra attention.

Using the best Raspberry Pi accessories and HATs around, they’re doing everything from controlling projects with their mind to launching golf clubs. In the end, whether or not these projects are practical is not always as important as the potential they show and the novelty they contribute to the maker community as a whole. 

Raspberry Pi Open Source Brain-Computer Interface

(Image credit: Ekaterina Bolovtsova on Pexels/Raspberry Pi Foundation)

This Raspberry Pi HAT is known as PiEEG. It’s designed to read electroencephalography (EEG) signals from users wearing a hat with electrodes. This HAT is not yet available but crowdfunding plans are in the works.

Why we love it:

We’ve come across Pi projects in the past that use brain waves to power custom responses on the Pi and love how fun the idea is. However, this project makes it easier to get started by compiling multiple EEG-related tools in one place.

Read: Raspberry Pi Open Source Brain-Computer Interface 

Raspberry Pi ARK-io Survival Deck and Weather Station 

(Image credit: Techno-recluse)

It’s not uncommon for Raspberry Pi projects to serve more than one role. When you’re running a full Linux OS, it’s easy to include extra features, programs, modules and more. That flexibility is how Techno-recluse’s simple weather station project evolved into a full-blown survival deck known as the ARK-io.

Why we love it:

Not only does this survival deck look fantastic with a professional finish, it provides plenty of useful emergency tools that can help in a pinch. From its RF receiver to the BN-220 GPS module, it has a ton of versatility that we really appreciate.

Read: Raspberry Pi ARK-io Survival Deck and Weather Station 

Fish Drives Raspberry Pi-Powered Tank

(Image credit: kabita darlam / Raspberry Pi Foundation)

The edge of the fish tank doesn’t have to be the boundary of its experience thanks to this Raspberry Pi-powered tank. With the help of a few cameras and motion detection software, this tank can be driven by the fish inside. As the fish approaches the edge of a tank, a motorized base with wheels steers the tank in that direction.

Why we love it:

This project proves you don’t have to be a mad scientist to create mind-blowing creations—you just need a little familiarity with Linux and a Raspberry Pi.

Read: Fish Drives Raspberry Pi-Powered Tank 

Raspberry Pi Mobile LTE Hotspot NAS

(Image credit: Treasurehunter613)

Choosing a Raspberry Pi project isn’t always easy but why settle for one function when you can have two? This Pi-based NAS doubles as a wireless, totally mobile hotspot. It uses a 4G HAT to connect to the internet and offers access to media for users to access nearby using mobile devices.

Why we love it:

We love excuses to build Pi projects and this one is definitely ideal for makers on the go. Forget tracking down WiFi hotspots and exposing yourself to strange network activity. This NAS hotspot centralizes your connection to a private network.

Read: Raspberry Pi Mobile LTE Hotspot NAS

Raspberry Pi Brings Apple CarPlay to Tesla

(Image credit: Michał Gapiński)

Sometimes the app you need isn’t on the platform you have. Such is the case here when maker Michał Gapiński noticed his Tesla has no support for Apple’s CarPlay application. With a little bit of work and a Raspberry Pi 4, he managed to successfully access the CarPlay app with his Tesla.

Why we love it:

Where there’s a will, there’s a way and where there’s a Pi, there’s innovation. This project took a bit of engineering to pull off but the end result is notable for its compatibility in a world of competing standards.

Read: Raspberry Pi Brings Apple CarPlay to Tesla 

Raspberry Pi Pico-Powered Super Game Boy Console

(Image credit: Element 14)

It takes two Picos to make this project run. This custom Game Boy console, dubbed the Game Guy, plays original Game Boy games on any external display using a Pico. A second Pico is used to handle the USB controller input.

Why we love it:

It’s Raspberry Pi mixed with original Game Boy hardware—of course we’re going to get excited. The final design and overall idea are big retro gaming winners in our book. It’s also neat to see a retro gaming project that doesn’t require ROMs or emulation software but we have a useful guide on how to set up RetroPie on the Raspberry Pi if you’re into that sort of thing.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico-Powered Super Game Boy Console 

Raspberry Pi Golf Club Launcher

(Image credit: Nick O’Hara)

There seems to be no limit to what users can automate with the help of a Raspberry Pi. This club launching project uses a Pi to interpret golf club selections using voice commands and launches the club at users—no caddy required.

Why we love it:

This Pi-powered club launcher takes us one step closer to an automated future filled with robots to handle our most mundane tasks. Whether or not it’s safe to launch clubs at people is another conversation but with a little dexterity most users can catch it and get back to the game.

Read: Raspberry Pi Golf Club Launcher 

Raspberry Pi Uses Nine Game Boy Screens as One

(Image credit: Kgsws)

Do you find it hard to make out details on the original 1.9in x 1.7in Game Boy screen? This Raspberry Pi project solves that problem by using nine separate Game Boy screens together as one display.

Why we love it:

It can be refreshing to see old hardware get recycled rather than discarded. Not only does this 9-panel Game Boy screen play original Game Boy games, but it also can work as an external display. Maker Kgsws even demonstrated a quick Minecraft session.

Read: Raspberry Pi Uses Nine Game Boy Screens as One

Raspberry Pi Detects Tonga Volcano Eruption Shockwave

(Image credit: Sandy Macdonald)

Maker Sandy Macdonald was quick to report findings to Twitter when his Raspberry Pi detected the shockwave from the Tonga volcano eruption. This led to a stream of makers around the world sharing their shockwave data throughout the remainder of the thread.

Why we love it:

It was intriguing enough to read through Macdonald’s findings and interpretation of the data but things just got more exciting as additional makers joined the discussion with their results. It doesn’t take much hardware to detect these sort of events—most were using a BME280 module for its pressure sensor to detect the shockwave.

Read: Raspberry Pi Detects Tonga Volcano Eruption Shockwave 

Raspberry Pi Barcodes Scanning Game Selector

(Image credit: Niel, RMC – The Cave)

We’ve seen plenty of cool systems to manage ROMs for retro gaming emulation but we’ve never seen anything quite like this Raspberry Pi-powered store front emulation platform. Instead of choosing a game from a menu like usual, users must pick up a physical case from one of the shelves and scan the barcode using a USB barcode scanner. This tells the Pi which game to load for users to play.

Why we love it:

This is such a simple idea with fine execution and a lot of hard work. We appreciate that this project brings back both the nostalgic gaming experience alongside the thrill of shopping for a new title on actual store shelves.

Read: Raspberry Pi Barcodes Scanning Game Selector

Tom’s Hardware’s Raspberry Pi Projects

If these projects have you excited to make something of your own, we’re right there with you. We’ve been busy putting together some projects of our own here at Tom’s Hardware and created some guides you can follow along with to see how they work. Not sure where to get started? Dig into one of these and see what you can create. 

How To Dual Boot Your Raspberry Pi

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

More than one OS on your Raspberry Pi? You betcha! Les shows us how you can have the best of both worlds in one place by setting up your Raspberry Pi to dual boot. You’ll only need the bare basics for this project—a Raspberry Pi with a micro SD card, power adapter, keyboard, mouse, external display and a secondary computer to help set things up.

Read: How To Dual Boot Your Raspberry Pi

How to Build a Morse Code Transmitter Light with Raspberry Pi

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Ryder shows us how to create a Morse code generating light using a Raspberry Pi. If you’ve ever wanted to communicate with someone over a short distance, this is one way most people won’t expect but will see coming a mile away.

Read: How to Build a Morse Code Transmitter Light with Raspberry Pi

How To Make a Raspberry Pi Pico Pedal Stream Controller 

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

In this project, Les uses guitar pedal switches with a Raspberry Pi Pico to create a custom stream controller. Changing effects in applications like OBS is as easy as tapping one of the switches with your foot.

Read: How To Make a Raspberry Pi Pico Pedal Stream Controller 

How To Build a Raspberry Pi Pico Simon Game

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Simon says, check out this Raspberry Pi Pico project and make it yourself at home! This tutorial from Les explains everything you need to get started. It doesn’t require a full-sized Pi, a Pico microcontroller will do.

Read: How To Build a Raspberry Pi Pico Simon Game 

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

The holidays are over but the Raspberry Pi projects are ramping up as we start 2022. We’re excited to share with you ten wonderful creations from the maker community over the past month and hope they inspire more projects into the new year.

These makers pulled out all the stops to design some of the most noteworthy Pi-based projects we’ve seen yet. Using the best Raspberry Pi accessories and HATs, the projects range from gaming platforms to hardware mods for the Pi itself.

Raspberry Pi 2-Player Cyberdeck Arcade

(Image credit: Crookdmouth)

Old school computing meets old school gaming with this impressive Raspberry Pi cyberdeck arcade project created by maker Crookdmouth. It’s inspired by an old TRS-80 MC-10 computer they had growing up and has a similar form factor with a 2-player arcade twist.

Why we love it:

Not only does the design of this project look fantastic but the execution is too nice to ignore. This housing is constructed from wood and features a built-in mechanical keyboard for the tactile feedback you would expect from a vintage machine.

Read: Raspberry Pi Cyberdeck Arcade 

Raspberry Pi PiCrawler Edge Detecting Mod

(Image credit: Disastrous-Cry-6452)

This project is built using Sunfounder’s PiCrawler kit. The maker of this mod created a system that can detect edges and prevent the PiCrawler from running over the edge. It uses a couple of IR sensors to determine when the floor is too far away for a safe step forward.

Why we love it:

There’s nothing worse than losing all of your hard work to the cruel hand of gravity. This is a clever mod to a popular kit that demonstrates how a little ingenuity can provide some of the best solutions in life.

Read: Raspberry Pi PiCrawler Edge Detecting Mod 

Raspberry Pi Closed Captions Project

(Image credit: Theloosearrow)

If you’re playing around with old CRT TVs, it might be worth looking into this closed captions project created by Theloosearrow. It takes the subtitle data for a video and processes it for output on a TV as CC text in real time.

Why we love it:

The idea for this project is clever and the end result looks fantastic. This is an excellent project for anyone looking to recreate the look and feel of TV captions while streaming video using a Raspberry Pi.

Read: Raspberry Pi Closed Captions Project 

Mico: An RP2040 USB Microphone

(Image credit: Mahesh Venkitachalam)

Tired of the background noise from his existing USB microphone, Mahesh Venkitachalam created an RP2040-powered USB microphone from scratch known as Mico. The end result is a custom PCB with some sleek logo graphics visible on top. According to Venkitachalam, the new mic works just as intended and records with better quality than the original.

Why we love it:

This isn’t just a cool RP2040-powered USB mic, it’s a great example of how well hard work can come together to realize a specific goal. The Mico looks fantastic and delivers just what it needs to, performance-wise.

Read: Mico RP2040 USB Microphone 

Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W External Antenna Mod

(Image credit: Brian Dorey)

The Pi community is still buzzing about the Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W and the new changes it brought to the table. Still makers are determined to make it their own like Brian Dorey and his external WiFi antenna mod.

Why we love it:

It didn’t take long for the community to start taking apart the new Pi Zero 2 W board. Overall, this is a fun modification deserving of extra recognition. If you want to upgrade the WiFi on your Pi Zero 2 W, this is one project you should take a closer look at.

Read: Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W External Antenna Mod 

Raspberry Pi RP2040 Pip-Boy

(Image credit: John Edgar Park)

You’re not ready for the wastelands until you’ve got yourself a Pip-Boy. This wearable prop resembles the original device found in the Fallout franchise. It’s RP2040-based and relies on the Adafruit Feather Joywing for navigation.

Why we love it:

The Fallout franchise is classic and this project is a great shoutout to the series. It features an original design that we can appreciate, including 3D printed assets and a custom script for managing the display.

Read: RP2040 Pip-Boy 

Raspberry Pi Sugar Cube Launcher

(Image credit: Equals Engineering)

Until the robot uprising, it’s important to remember that the machines we have in life work for us. Such is the case with this sugar cube launching project created by Equals Engineering. Using a Raspberry Pi, it can locate the distance of a cup and launch a sugar cube straight into your tea.

Why we love it:

This is an excellent use of image recognition and real-time calculating for a humorous and somewhat practical application. It not only identifies a cup but manages to determine the most ideal trajectory to land the cube into the cup.

Read: Raspberry Pi Sugar Cube Launcher

Raspberry Pi Time Machine Radio

(Image credit: Byte-rider)

This time machine radio project takes users through time by offering a dial in the corner with a selection of decades. Choosing a decade will “tune” the Raspberry Pi inside to music exclusively to the era selected. The hardware is housed inside of a vintage radio.

Why we love it:

Some of the best Raspberry PI projects are made with others in mind and this one was created to be a gift. It’s a beautiful project and the mysterious question marks on the dial are perhaps the most endearing feature.

Read: Raspberry Pi Time Machine Radio

Raspberry Pi Drives Car With Hand Gestures

(Image credit: Mohammad Reza Sharifi)

We’ve seen tons of custom controllers over the years and have even made some of our own. That said, this is the first one we’ve come across that uses hand gestures to send control signals. Mahammad Reza Sharifi has created a driving application for his Raspberry Pi-powered car that relies on hand signs with the help of image recognition.

Why we love it:

This is a clever demonstration of how image recognition can be used to change the way we interact with hardware. The applications of this concept are versatile and could be applied to much more than driving a car.

Read: Raspberry Pi Hand Gesture Robot Car

GLaDOS Robotic Voice Assistant

(Image credit: Henri Rantanen, Nerdaxic)

This Raspberry Pi GLaDOS voice assistant brings the antagonist to the Portal video game franchise to life not just in audio but as a physical unit. Henri Rantanen of Nerdaxis has created a huge GLaDOS head that looks and sounds like the classic villain with the help of a Raspberry Pi.

Why we love it:

Even if you’ve never heard of Portal, it’s easy to appreciate the amount of work that went into designing and animating this robotic head. Many of the components are 3D printed and took a great deal of time to refine and finish.

Read: Raspberry Pi GLaDOS Voice Assistant

Tom’s Hardware’s Raspberry Pi Projects

We don’t just write about Raspberry Pi projects, we make some of our own. Here are a few things we’ve created lately along with tutorials so you can recreate them yourself. There are tons of Raspberry Pi boards to tinker with and it doesn’t cost much to get started with one of these exciting projects.

How to Create Digital Dice with Raspberry Pi Pico

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Looking for a project suitable for tabletop gaming night? Les shows us how to create a digital dice using a Raspberry Pi Pico along with a small display module. By pressing the button, a number will be displayed taking the place of a roll.

Read: Raspberry Pi Digital Dice

Raspberry Pi Pico Powered RFID Lighting

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

If you’ve ever wanted to play around with RFID, now’s your chance! This project, created by Les Pounder, uses the Raspberry Pi Pico to create some cool lighting effects. Overall, this is a great example of how easy it can be to trigger custom code using RFID triggers.

Read: Raspberry Pi Pico RFID Lighting 

How to Build a Tweeting Weather Bot with Raspberry Pi

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Ryder Damen shows us how to make a custom weather reporting bot that sends details to Twitter in the form of status updates. It can take a picture and provide sensor data for things like temperature, humidity and more.

Read: Raspberry Pi Tweeting Weather Bot

Raspberry Pi Holiday Advent Calendar

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

Countdown to the holidays (or some other important date) with the Raspberry Pi-powered countdown calendar created by Ryder Damen. The new year might be upon us but there are plenty of holidays to prepare for and this project is perfect for building up hype.

Read: Raspberry Pi Holiday Advent Calendar

How to Control DMX Lights with Raspberry Pi

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

We’re not saying every DJ needs a Raspberry Pi in their kit but it might not be a bad idea to have one on hand. In this case, Ryder shows us how to use a Raspberry Pi to control DMX lights.

Read: Raspberry Pi Controlled DMX Lights